General > Politics

Outdated Voting Rights Act

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ArtDrake:
These ****** cartoons are the last straw. I'm out.

SmartyPants:
The fake, overblown outrage is unnecessary, because there is nothing controversial or offensive about those political cartoons.

All the cartoons illustrate valid reasons for Voter ID laws:

* The first cartoon makes a reference to Voter ID laws being intended to prevent criminals voting on behalf of the deceased.
* The second cartoon is a list of examples where one would need a picture ID besides voting such as buying alcohol, driving a car, cashing a check, and to see Eric Holder say voter ID laws are racist.
* The third cartoon comments on how being required to show a picture ID to vote is much less burdensome than the Obamacare mandate that forces people to fill out numerous extra IRS forms in order prove one is insured.

SmartyPants:
Recently, we had the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington.  It was time to celebrate the progress our country has made.  No longer are bathrooms, restaurants, or schools segregated as "whites" and "colors".  No longer are certain people forced to sit at the back of the bus.  No longer are black men getting lynched, and then the perpetrators gets away due to a racist, all-white jury.  No longer are minorities intimidated at the polling booth. No longer is racism rampant among our country.

The series of speeches celebrating the 50th Anniversary shows how outdated the voting rights act has become.  During the celebration, the civil rights speakers claim that the major problems of racism today are Stop and Frisk and the death of Trayvon Martin.  Stop and Frisk is a police policy used in New York City, while Trayvon died in the state of Florida. Neither of these states are covered by the Voting Rights Act.

CraigStern:

--- Quote from: SmartyPants on August 29, 2013, 03:53:24 PM ---The series of speeches celebrating the 50th Anniversary shows how outdated the voting rights act has become.
--- End quote ---

You just named a bunch of different things that have nothing do with voting rights. As we covered before, a number of states are still trying to suppress minority voter turnout.

There's been quite a bit more than that as well, which I didn't even get into before. Some prominent examples that journalists happened to catch: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voter_suppression#2008_presidential_election

SmartyPants:

--- Quote from: CraigStern on September 04, 2013, 07:28:00 AM ---There's been quite a bit more than that as well, which I didn't even get into before. Some prominent examples that journalists happened to catch: Voter suppression@2008 presidential election
--- End quote ---
Your post further proves my point.  The states that had allegations of voter suppression were Georgia, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Ohio, Wisconsin, Maryland, and Florida.  Other than Georgia, none of the eight states with voter allegation were in the South.  Clearly, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 is outdated and needs to be updated to represent current trends.   I don't know why anyone would oppose updating the formula that determines what areas currently have problems with voter suppression.   Maybe those up North want to look down on the South as inherently more racist, while they deny that northern states like Illinois and New York have their own racial problems.

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